The golden Rrules of Job applications in the Middle East

Applying for a job in this highly competitive market can be very taxing, especially when you’re neither finding a job nor getting invited to interview. Jobseekers all have different personalities, perceptions and backgrounds. In other words, the job search advice and tips available are not always understood in the same way by everyone.

If you find yourself applying for numerous jobs to no avail, then you must consider some changes. Before you apply for your next job, here are the three pillars of a successful application.

1. Check the company’s website

Before applying check the company’s website, social media pages, and any news clippings they have. Make sure it is the kind of company you want to work at, and ensure you optimise your CV and cover letter to suit the company’s mission and vision values.

2. Tailor keywords

Keywords are really important in your CV because most employers use search engines to find CVs by keywords, as opposed to browsing. Make sure your CV is full of keywords relevant to what you do. Bayt recently took a look at the top keywords employers are using when looking for candidates on Bayt.com, and these were: "Sales" (searched for over 170,000 times in 2016 alone), followed by "Manager", "Engineer", "Accountant", and "HR". Edit your CV to include these keywords and help employers find you.

3. Cover letter

This is a vital part of any job application process. Do not just summarise your CV in a few paragraphs, rather highlight your most notable achievements, key skills and eagerness to work. After completing the job application process, following up is equally important. It shows potential employers that you have great follow-up skills and that you’re always interested in what is going on.

But, many candidates fall short in that department. Some mistakes that job seekers make could present them as annoying, unprofessional, or clingy. There is a thin line between following up and nagging. These tips should help you navigate that thin line:

a. Be considerate: When calling or sending an email, do so outside peak hours. In addition, avoid holidays, weekends and late nights. This will show the manager that you respect their valuable time.

b. Be prepared: When following up, be prepared to answer any questions about your career or the work you could be doing if hired. A safe approach would be to be prepared for an interview at any time.

c. Be selective: When calling the company, ask for the hiring manager or the head of the department you applied to work in. You want to make sure you are talking to a decision maker. But, be aware that some companies will state that you shouldn’t follow up. If that’s the case, don’t follow up.

Finally, work out what type of a job seeker you are, and then consider changing if this approach hasn’t worked for you.

Bayt in-house experts recently narrowed down the types of seekers that they’ve come across over the years. The three categories are not a standard but rather a guide to gaining insights about the perspective employees’ personality and approach to situations.

If your approach falls under any of the following categories, make sure you know how some employers might interpret it.

 The persistent job seeker

The job seeker who does not simply submit their CV and wait for the employer to get back to them. This type of job seeker makes sure to follow-up on their application status. Although this is a tricky category to fall under, this could potentially show future employers you are eager. Which, in the business world, translates to someone who gets things done.

The ghost jobseeker

This job seeker likes to regularly check vacancies posted online but never actually applies to any. This type of job seeker is hard to identify and therefore not actively looking for jobs. "Ghosts" intent on finding a new job should take their search more seriously and start applying. A ghost could come off as uninterested in work or a company, as well as having an inability to perform.

The late to the party jobseeker

This one spends time looking for a job online but doesn’t actually apply until just before the deadline. Create job alerts so you can apply to relevant jobs as soon as they are published.

Suhail Masri is the vice president of employer solutions at the Middle East jobs site Bayt.com

Free Courses Launched to build workers careers in Dubai

Scores of blue-collar workers have started receiving free English classes and other courses to boost their skills set under an initiative of Danube Welfare Centre (DWC) in partnership with Jebel Ali Free Zone Authority (Jafza).

More than 1,000 workers in Jafza South accommodation units have registered for the training, which includes personality development; interview, presentation and communication skills; as well as computer literacy.

The programme was officially launched on Thursday by top representatives from Danube, Jafza and Community Development Authority (CDA) at the DWC in Jafza South. It aims to eventually reach around 15,000 potential worker-students in the area and even more beyond.

A main goal of the initiative is to equip workers with skills and confidence so they can build their careers. It comes in line with the Year of Giving initiative of the UAE.

Students will attend three classes a week — each an hour long — over several months, depending on their standing as a beginner, intermediate or advanced, which is assessed during registration. They will be able to take evening and Friday classes outside their regular work hours.

Sana Sajan, Director of DWC, said the initiative is the brainchild of Rizwan Sajan, founder and chairman of Danube Group. She explained that an employee who was once asked to prepare a scoreboard for a company team-building cricket match declined to do so. Later, he confided to Rizwan Sajan that he had declined because he did not know how to write. His situation moved Sajan to, initially, start the classes for Danube employees. Later, a centre in Karama was opened to accommodate more workers; around 5,000 workers have completed their course through the centre.

On Thursday, Sajan, flanked by top officials from Jafza, CDA and other entities, formally inaugurated the DWC in Jafza South for workers in the area, who are employed at various firms. During a tour of the centre, the officials interacted with the students and urged them to pursue their dreams. They later briefed media about the programme.

When asked about his reason for launching the DWC service in Jafza South, Sajan said: “I felt this was one small way I could give back to society. Already 5,000 people have learnt through, and we can double this figure in a year.”

He added: “Without support from Jafza, this would not have been possible. My vision is to train blue-collar workers so they can elevate their position and earn more. If they learn English and computer skills and are groomed under a guided programme, they can do a better job, apply for a new position, and earn more money.”

Mohammad Al Mua’alem, CEO of Jafza, described the programme as “a noble initiative”, saying Jafza was “really pleased to be partners” in the initiative, and promised full support for the cause.

Omar Al Muthanna, CEO of CDA, said the goal of the CDA and such initiatives is to “move from regular welfare to community empowerment” so workers and others can “have the right tools — education, skills, and knowledge — to move to a more independent situation”.

The DWC is a non-profit social organisation licensed by the CDA, offering a range of free training courses to help unskilled workers improve their language skills and further develop their careers.

16 High-paying Jobs with Fast-growing Salaries

Earning potential isn't just dependent on snagging a high-paying job. You also need a job in which your wages will continue to grow steadily.
Job search and salary comparison site Glassdoor zeroed in on this intersection to determine which roles are providing the strongest wages and rapid pay growth.

According to Glassdoor, "We compared two key metrics of pay against each other: The level of pay (i.e., median base pay), versus year-over-year pay growth. Ideally, employees would want to be in the 'sweet spot' — jobs that are both high-growth and high-paying."
The list provides a strong mix of jobs, ranging from analyst to truck driver, and includes roles in engineering, healthcare and education.

These are the 16 jobs providing the most powerful combination of base pay and wage growth:

1. Professor

Median base pay: $90,007
Wage increase, YOY: $4,934
Wage growth, YOY: 5.8 percent

2. Customer Service Manager

Median base pay: $54,177
Wage increase, YOY: $3,733
Wage growth, YOY: 7.4 percent

3. Attorney

Median base pay: $98,594
Wage increase, YOY: $3,426
Wage growth, YOY: 3.6 percent

4. Programmer Analyst

Median base pay: $69,233
Wage increase, YOY: $3,360
Wage growth, YOY: 5.1 percent

5. Software Engineer

Median base pay: $86,391
Wage increase, YOY: $3,082
Wage growth, YOY: 3.7 percent

6. Quality Engineer

Median base pay: $73,238
Wage increase, YOY: $2,749
Wage growth, YOY: 3.9 percent

7. Operations Manager

Median base pay: $66,730
Wage increase, YOY: $2,567
Wage growth, YOY: 4.0 percent

8. Registered Nurse

Median base pay: $65,930
Wage increase, YOY: $2,536
Wage growth, YOY: 4.0 percent
 
9. Manufacturing Engineer

Median base pay: $71,773
Wage increase, YOY: $2,427
Wage growth, YOY: 3.5 percent
 
10. Business Development Manager

Median base pay: $69,181
Wage increase, YOY: $2,339
Wage growth, YOY: 3.5 percent

11. Data Analyst

Median base pay: $59,084
Wage increase, YOY: $2,272
Wage growth, YOY: 4.0 percent

12. Business Analyst

Median base pay: $64,284
Wage increase, YOY: $2,114
Wage growth, YOY: 3.4 percent

13. Accountant

Median base pay: $55,747
Wage increase, YOY: $1,989
Wage growth, YOY: 3.7 percent

14. Buyer

Median base pay: $58,550
Wage increase, YOY: $1,980
Wage growth, YOY: 3.5 percent

15. Technical Editor

Median base pay: $52,955
Wage increase, YOY: $1,392
Wage growth, YOY: 2.7 percent
 
16. Truck Driver

Median base pay: $51,577
Wage increase, YOY: $1,356
Wage growth, YOY: 2.7 percent
 

The golden Rrules of Job applications in the Middle East

Applying for a job in this highly competitive market can be very taxing, especially when you’re neither finding a job nor getting invi...